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Buzzards - people just wont listen

Article in a Tipperary paper last week warned people that Buzzards were targeting pet dogs be on alert, the below article is Birdwatch Irelands response - http://www.birdwatchireland.ie/Publications/eWings/eWingsIss...

BrianOC
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

what next lol will they be taking babies from prams.
I have to disagree with birdwatch ireland though they do have a significant impact on hares .
i have seen them taking leverts and even watched one trying its best to tackle a full grown February hare

stephen jerrard
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

That's ridiculous to say they target pet dogs...we have a family of buzzards around us, only appeared in the last few years and they don't show any interest in my poultry and equally the hens take no notice of them whereas they go berserk when the sparrowhawk is around.
They are stunning birds with a really distinctive call, I'd hate to see them go.

sarah
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

I've never seen them eating carrion from road kill and I've seen them feeding on hares and rabbits in the middle of a field there's not a hare or rabbit left around my area the native Irish hare that's protected is sadly in decline and the buzzards are on the increase it appears you need a degree now to know anything about wildlife

Ken Wex
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

I see 3 buzzards most mornings as its getting light feeding earthworms in field next to my house.

martib
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

Must have been a slow week in Tipp to print that nonsense. Any terrier worth its salt would make mince meat out of a buzzard. Maybe they were on about those rat sized Yorkies. Don't really see the attraction of them. I know of a few cases were they have been badly injured by people simply trodding on them

Pheasantbotherer
Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

Ken Wex I travel from Louth to Dublin every day and that's when I see the Buzzards most, from the car as they search along the roads for road kill, I almost knocked one down as it was trying to lift a rat off the road and could not gain altitude as it took off from the road just north of Ratoath. So as they are hardly able to lift a rat I'd say Pheasantbotherer is spot on, they are big birds but a lot of the size is feathers. Having carried full grown hares back across a few fields after shooting them(a good few years ago now) I doubt any Buzzard would be anywhere near enough the size to tackle a full grown hare, I know by the time I got back to the car I was pissed off I did. Leverets I'd say would be no bother to them, but I think you got a unique instance Stephen Jerrard of one trying it for the first and maybe last time.

BrianOC
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Thats maybe so Brian ,but it was trying its best ! i watched it with binos from my kitchen window the hare went into a whitethorn clump in the end
As far as leverets go our farm always had a healthy hare population ,once the buzzard 'reintroduction' started the hare population dwindled ,now the sight of a hare especially a leveret is a rare thing , as is the sighting of a grey squirrel
Leverets in my opinion stand little chance a buzzard can sit high in a tree or any vantage point for hours , with their phenomenal eyesight they can spot any movement from hundreds of yards and off they go a deal with whatever they see .
In natural prey/predator densities thats sustainable but what we experienced maybe 15 years ago now was 7-10 buzzards in communal groups wheeling and hunting over head
Now i'm in no way anti BOP ,i am in fact the reverse but i do recognize unnatural densities and behavior , despite what anyone tells me ,i firmly believe the buzzards on this island got a big helping hand in their relocation and reintroduction
No wild bred BOP would fly to a man standing out in the middle of a grass field and circle for minutes or come to a whistle , that's something i witnessed numerous times in those early years when buzzards first made a reappearance .

stephen jerrard
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Just a few thoughts.
As far as i know Buzzard was not reintroduced. Was absent from Ireland for many years up until 15 or 20 years ago when a few pairs reestablished in North and have gradually spread south. I could be wrong but haven't come across any information on captive breeding programmes. Have plenty around me, Around 5 breeding pairs and have seen them take live prey , feeding on road kill and also worms in fresh ploughed fields. They will exploit the most easily available food source. With regard to drop in numbers of hares. Perhaps this is down to the haemoragic virus currently affecting rabbits, other predation (mink and pine marten) not to mention lack of cover for due to modern farming practice (how many farmers verges unkept or leave thistle in fields as cover for game).

Tom Doyle
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Tom the pairs in the north must have been prolific breeders then , in north meath where i'm talking about there were non from 1990 till 2002 i never saw a buzzard ,then they were here in dozens ,showing little or no fear of man in fact quite the opposite .plenty of them around here but seeing double numbers circling on an updraft thermal is not normal imho
Buzzards like pine martens have had an helping hand from unknown sources . npws or foresters im not sure but the speed of recolonisation is remarkable , i know pine martens are fast and secretive but they can't spread at the rate they did on four little feet lol
anyway as i said previously i have no problems with any BOP martens however are a different kettle of fish

stephen jerrard
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Steven I don't know how you can say specifically that there were none around Meath from 1990 till 2002. The North is where they are in highest numbers and around Louth which is beside Meath its hard and has been hard not to see them for as long as I can remember. There are breeding pairs in all Counties down as far as Kerry, and its not like they avoided Meath on the way down there. I can accept you may have not seen or noticed them but not that they have not been there, and while most of the roads in Meath I travel on are in South East Meath I have noticed them there for over 20 years. Also they are prolific breeders and usually the groups are family groups, I've never seen more than 5 together.

BrianOC
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

pm sent Brian

stephen jerrard
Thursday, December 8th, 2016

They are a beautiful Bird and have a right to our countryside,as do all our wild animals....it's up to individualspeed to keep their animals secure whether dogs cats poultry lambs or goldfish....if a child sees a sweet theyd want it

ROGER DEEGAN
Friday, December 9th, 2016

The biggest threat to the native hare population as far as i can see are the gangs roaming the countryside with lurchers and then posting on facebook pictures of the two or three hares they killed that day. They are out by night as well at 3 to 4 am . The hares have no chance

johnnyg
Friday, December 9th, 2016

Awful scare today, the youngest baby was on the back of the pony pulling the sulky in the garden today when this big Buzzard swooped down & took hold a the child & off with her. Only for the young lad having his drone out & him able to fly after the Buzzard & cut him off at low altitude & the child fell into a bale of hay, on me solemn oath I think I'd have had a heart attack. We had a lucky escape, those Buzzards are something else & the drones are great for looking into peoples back gardens or the young lad spying on the young wan down the road lying out during the Summer but Id say its the first time I seen them chasing down a Buzzard. All this arguing over Hares when they'd take a small child..........

Birdeen
Sunday, December 11th, 2016

Il use a bigger Buzzard next time Birdeen.

bantam1
Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

So it was you Bantam, I thought you were a nice man.

Birdeen
Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

I am Birdeen and I wont add to you'r woes.But seriously I respect all birdlife and am thrilled at seeing the buzzards
I will admit they seem to be advancing at a rapid rate. It must be hard for them all to make a decent living.They are primarily scavingers and totally different to sparrowhawks so keep your hare's no.
Long may they soar.

bantam1
Thursday, December 15th, 2016

Sorry (on).

bantam1
Thursday, December 15th, 2016

There's a reason we falconers don't bother with the Common Buzzard....they have tiny feet for their body-size. Hence they struggle to take even a young rabbit despite having roughly similar body size to birds such as Harris or Redtails. A falconer's bird will always take bigger / more challenging prey than a wild counterpart of the same species. Buzzards really aren't up to much more than carrion and rodents.

spudlington
Tuesday, July 4th, 2017


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